Tag Archives: Hawthorne

Hawthorne Hotel (1925)

In 1809, the corner of Washington Square and Essex Street, off Salem Common in Salem, became the site of the Archer Block. Later called the Franklin Building, it was a commercial and residential building constructed under the direction of Samuel … Continue reading

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Salem Custom House (1819)

The last in a series of 13 custom houses built in Salem since 1649, the Salem Custom House of 1819 is famous for being featured in the introduction to Nathaniel Hawthorne‘s The Scarlet Letter (1850). Hawthorne worked in the Custom … Continue reading

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The Benjamin W. Crowninshield House (1812)

Built 1810-1812 on Derby Street in Salem, the Benjamin W. Crowninshield House may be based on a plan by Samuel McIntire, but completed after his death by his son, Samuel Field McIntire. Benjamin Williams Crowninshield was a congressman and Secretary … Continue reading

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The Simon Forrester House (1790)

In 1791, Capt. Simon Forrester acquired an unfinished house on Derby Street in Salem. The three-story hipped-roof house has been attributed to Samuel McIntire and the east parlor mantelpiece, carved by McIntire, is now in the Peabody Essex Museum. Forrester … Continue reading

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Nathaniel Hawthorne Birthplace (1730)

The house in which the author, Nathaniel Hawthorne, was born on July 4, 1804 and lived in until he was age 4 is located in Salem. It was originally on Union Street, but in 1958 it was moved to a … Continue reading

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The Old Manse (1770)

The famous house in Concord known as the “Old Manse,” has associations with the Revolutionary War and with two of America’s greatest literary figures. It was built in 1770 as a “manse”, or parsonage, for the town’s minister, William Emerson. … Continue reading

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The House of the Seven Gables (1668)

The House of the Seven Gables, aka/ the Capt. John-Turner House or the Turner-Ingersoll MansionFew houses in the world have the fame and literary associations of the House of the Seven Gables. The earliest section was built on Derby Street … Continue reading

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