Monthly Archives: March 2010

Richard Salter Storrs Library (1932)

In 1907, Sarah Williams Storrs, who lived in the former home of her grandfather, Rev. Richard Salter Storrs in Longmeadow, left the house and $5000 to the town to establish a library in memory of her grandfather. The house contained … Continue reading

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Emerson Hall, Harvard (1905)

Emerson Hall, located in Harvard Yard in Cambridge, is the home of the University’s Philosophy Department. Named for Ralph Waldo Emerson, the building was designed by Guy Lowell and was completed in 1905. The noted psychologist and philosopher, William James, … Continue reading

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Posted in Cambridge, Collegiate, Colonial Revival, Neoclassical | Tagged | 1 Comment

Weld Hall, Harvard (1872)

According to the Official guide to Harvard University of 1907: Weld Hall, containing 53 suites of rooms, of which 22 are single and the rest double, was built in 1871-72, at a cost of about $87,000. It was given by … Continue reading

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Grays Hall, Harvard (1863)

Grays Hall is a Harvard dormitory, built on the spot where Harvard’s earliest building, Old College, once stood. According to the Official guide to Harvard University of 1907: Grays Hall, built in 1863 by the College, at a cost of … Continue reading

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The Captain David Burt House (1725)

Originally a center-chimney house, built in 1725, the Captain David Burt House is considered to be one of Longmeadow’s oldest houses. The center chimney was destroyed in a fire in the nineteenth century and replaced by a central staircase and … Continue reading

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Quincy Market (1826)

Quincy Market, which stretches 365 feet and led to the opening of six new streets when it was built in 1824-1826, was Boston’s first major project after incorporating as a city in 1822. Named for mayor Josiah Quincy, the building … Continue reading

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Winthrop Building (1894)

The Winthrop Building, originally known as the Carter Building, was Boston’s first steel-frame office building and led the way to later skyscrapers. Designed by Clarence H. Blackall, it was built in 1894 facing Washington Street, with its long curving side … Continue reading

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