The Charles Sumner House (1805)

At 20 Hancock Street on Beacon Hill in Boston is the home once occupied by Senator Charles Sumner. It was built in 1805 by Ebenezer Farley and was purchased by Sumner’s father in 1830. Charles Sumner was a fiery opponent of slavery and the victim of a famous caning, delivered by Representative Preston Brooks on the floor of the Senate on May 22, 1856. After the Civil War, Sumner was a leader of the Radical Republicans. He lived in the house until 1867 and was possibly the one who added the Greek Revival portico that links nos. 20 and 22 Beacon Hill.

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One Response to The Charles Sumner House (1805)

  1. Thom Nickels says:

    I lived in this house while finishing up my alternate service work contract as a Vietnam War-era conscientious objector. I saw and experienced strange things while I lived there. Look for the forthcoming book.

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