Florence Congregational Church (1861)

Florence Congregational Church

The Florence Congregational Church, at 130 Pine Street in Northampton, was constructed starting in 1861. The village of Florence was developing as an industrial area at the time. Before the church was built, residents had to make the Sunday trip to Northampton to attend church services. The Florence Church had its beginnings in 1857 as a fair weather outdoor Sunday school for the First Church of Northampton. The church has a Stick style Parish House designed by William Fenno Pratt.

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W. H. Lyman House (1870)

319 Elm St., Northampton

The Gothic cottage at 319 Elm Street in Northampton, built in 1870, was designed by William Fenno Pratt for W. H. Lyman. A later owner was S. C. Parsons.

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Todd Block, Northampton (1870)

Todd Block

The William Todd Block, at 153-159 Main Street in Northampton (the building on the left in the image above), is a commercial/apartment building erected in 1870. It was designed by J.M. Miner. It replaced an earlier brick building on the site that was destroyed by fire in July 1870. As related in The Attractions of Northampton (1871), by Charles H. Chandler:

The year 1870 will long be remembered in Northampton on account of the two great fires which occurred, and the consequent impulse given to business by rebuilding. The fire of May 18 destroyed the Edwards Church and the North Block; that of July 19 the Warner House, Todd’s Block, and several smaller edifices. By these two fires the whole business center of the town was threatened, and in fact narrowly escaped destruction. As a result, the Edwards Church has been rebuilt on a new site in a superior manner, and the new Fitch Hotel rears its lofty front where the Warner House stood. Todd, Lee & Co. have erected a fine brick block on the old site of the Edwards Church, and W. H. Todd has rebuilt his block, and most of the other buildings burned have been replaced by better and more substantial structures. Besides, Messrs. Dawson, Fitch and Crafts have built a brick block on the corner of Main street and Strong avenue, and Wright & Co. have entirely remodeled their store, putting on a new front.

Next to the Todd Block, at 147-149 Main Street (the building on the right in the image above), is the Serio Block, built c. 1860. Originally called the Clapp and Johnson Block, it was part of what was known as granite row. The building’s second story was added during a renovation in 1870.

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John C. Hammond House (1891)

John C. Hammond House

The house at 222 Elm Street in Northampton was built in 1891 for John C. Hammond (1842-1926), a lawyer. It was designed by R. F. Putnam, an Amherst Academy schoolmate of Hammond. The young Calvin Coolidge, the future president, read law in “Judge” Hammond’s law office and stayed in the house when the Hammond family was away during the summers in Goshen. The house remained in the Hammond family for many years.

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Sylvester Graham House (1800)

Sylvester Graham House

The house at 111 Pleasant Street in Northampton was built around 1800. In 1836 it was purchased by Sylvester Graham, who lived there until his death in 1851. Sylvester Graham was a dietary reformer and temperance advocate who emphasized vegetarianism and baking a type of bread made with unbolted wheat flour, known as Graham Flour. The Graham Cracker is also named for him. The house‘s original gable roof was later replaced with a mansard roof.

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William Clark House (1886)

Clark-Eames House

The house at 149 Elm Street in Northampton was built around 1886 on the site of earlier houses owned by the Sage and Clark families. From 1935 to 1958 it was owned by the Eames family as a guest house (appropriately called Eames Home) that was frequented by guests of Smith College students.

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First National Bank, Northampton (1928)

First National Bank

The First National Bank building at 1 King Street in Northampton was built in 1928. A bank had existed on the site since 1865. The current impressive structure on the site was designed in the Art Deco/Art Moderne style by J. Williams Beal & Sons. Since 1993 the building has been home to Silverscape Designs, founded by jewelry-designer Denis Perlman, who loving restored the former bank.

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