Dwight Kellogg House (1825)

Kellogg House

The house at 14 Franklin Street in Westfield was built in 1825 for Wareham Sackett by Ephraim Crary. It passed to Sackett’s daughter, Henrietta, who married Capt. George Whipple. Their daughter, Julia, married Dwight Kellogg, for whose name the house was afterward known. The house is now used for offices and is in a commercial area.

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George H. Perry House (1873)

214 Maple St., Holyoke

The building at 214 Maple Street in Holyoke was built around 1873 and was part of a block belonging to the Whiting Paper Company. By 1887 it was the residence of George H. Perry, a foreman of Parsons Paper Company. Alden Press purchased the building in 1917 and built a rear addition. As noted in The American Printer of April 5, 1917:

Alden Press Moves and Enlarges

The Alden Press of Holyoke, of which Edward S. Alden is president, has purchased the three-story building at 214 Maple Street. The firm took possession of the building some months ago and has spent a large sum in equipping it as a first-class printing plant. The Artisan, a labor weekly, is published here and there is a job department also. Among new equipment have been added a rotary press, monotype machine and two job presses.

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United Congregational Church, Holyoke (1885)

United Congregational Church, Holyoke

The Second Congregational Church (now United Congregational Church) of Holyoke was organized in 1849 as the First Congregational Society of Ireland Depot, taking the name of Second Congregational the following year when Holyoke became a town. Its first church, designed by New Haven architect Henry Austin, was erected in 1853 at the northeast corner of High and Dwight streets. A new church, located at 395 High Street, was erected in 1882-1885. It was designed by P. B. Johnson. By 1868 the congregation was the largest Congregational church in New England, and the fifth largest in the country. Attached to the 1885 church is the Skinner Memorial Chapel, designed by Allen and Collens and completed in 1912. A fire in 1919 destroyed the church, but left the bell tower and chapel standing. A new church, matching the architecture of the chapel, was soon built, also designed by Allen and Collens. In 1996 Second Congregational merged with Grace United Church (itself a 1973 merger of Grace Church and First United Congregational Church) to form the United Congregational Church of Holyoke.

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Morrissey Block (1842)

Morrissey Block

The building on the corner of Elm and Main Streets (2 Main Street) in Holyoke, was erected in 1842 for Lyman and Thomas Lewis. Originally a boarding house, the building was soon operated as a hotel called the Westfield House. It was expanded on the north side in 1855. After the hotel closed in 1894, the local district courthouse occupied the upper section of the building from 1904 through the 1930s. Later names for the building were the Morrissey Block and the Park Square Building. Read More

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Old Holyoke Railroad Station (1883)

station

The City of Holyoke has a railroad station designed by the famed architect H. H. Richardson. Located at 12 Bowers Street, it was built in 1883-1885 as the Boston and Maine Railroad Station, also known as the Connecticut River Railroad Station. No longer a station, its later history included use as the Star Automotive Warehouse. It is currently an endangered building.
Check out the following PDF documents:
On the history of the station: http://www.holyokeredevelopment.com/wp-content/uploads/Depot-Sq.-Presentation-Boards-FINAL-small-file.pdf
On the potential reuse of the station: http://www.holyokeredevelopment.com/wp-content/uploads/Part-1-from-RICHARDSON_Report_FINAL.pdf
Read More

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Trinity Lutheran Church, Worcester (1951)

Trinity Lutheran Church, Worcester

Trinity Lutheran Church in Worcester officially formed on January 1, 1948 through the merger of First, Bethany and Calvary parishes. The merged parish erected a new church at 73 Lancaster Street, built in stages between 1948 and 1951. The building is heavily influenced by Scandinavian church architecture.

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Commerce Building (1897)

Commerce Building, Worcester

The building at 340 Main Street in Worcester was built c. 1894-1897 to designs by the prestigious architectural firm of Peabody and Stearns. Known today as the Commerce Building (named for later tenant Commerce Bank), it was originally built for the State Mutual Life Insurance Company. Founded in 1844-1845 as the nation’s fifth life insurance company, it had previously been located in an 1870 building at 240 Main Street.

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