Category Archives: Queen Anne

Corcoran School (1900)

Corcoran School

The Corcoran School, at 40 Walnut Street in Clinton, opened in 1900 as a public grammar school. It is the third school to occupy the southwest corner of Walnut and Church Streets since 1846: the original wooden schoolhouse on the site was replaced by a high school, built in 1854, which became a grammar school in the 1880s and stood until it was taken down in 1899 in preparation for building the current structure. Designed by Boston architect Charles J. Bateman, the school was originally called the New Grammar School or School House #10, until 1918 when it was officially named in honor of John W. Corcoran, a former member of the school committee. Closed as a school in 1981, the building was rehabilitated in the 1990s to become the Corcoran House, an assisted living facility. The building has two notable facades, as seen in the images above and below.

Corcoran School

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Posted in Clinton, Colonial Revival, Queen Anne, Schools | Comments Off

Oren Smith – Mary Daniels House (1891)

23 Massasoit Street

The house at 23 Massasoit Street in Northampton was built as one of three originally identical houses and is the best preserved of the group. It was constructed in 1891 by Oren Smith, who had purchased the rear section of the Wood Homnestead on Elm Street in 1888. Smith owned the house until 1901, when he sold it to Mary Daniels, the wife of Joseph Daniels, an insurance agent.

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William C. Clark House (1887)

William C. Clark House (1887)

The house at 52 Broad Street in Westfield was built in 1886-1887 for William C. Clark. He served as town selectman and his son, Frederic, was a surgeon who used the house as his home and office.

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284 Maple Street, Holyoke (1880)

Now standing isolated on block that once contained a row of houses, 284 Maple Street is the sole survivor of an affluent neighborhood in Holyoke. Nothing is now known about who built the house (c. 1880) or who first lived in it. The concrete steps are not original. Today the building houses a law firm.

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Maplewood Hotel, Holyoke (1890)

Built c. 1889-1890 at 328 Maple Street, at the end of a group of row houses in Holyke, the former Maplewood Hotel was modeled on the elegant residential hotels of larger cities. It was constructed by Frank Beebe, of the Beebe, Webber & Co. woolen mill. He lived in the hotel from 1890 to 1906.

Next to the former hotel, at 330 Maple Street, is a Queen Anne-style house, built earlier in the 1880s. Since 1924, the house and the hotel have been connected on the interior and are regarded as a single property. 330 Maple Street is currently rented by Templo Emanuel Inc.

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Posted in Holyoke, Hotels, Houses, Queen Anne, Romanesque Revival | Comments Off

Clovis Robert Block (1888)

The Clovis Robert Block, at 338-348 Main Street in Holyoke, is a stylistically Eclectic Victorian commercial structure, with apartment space on the upper floors, completed in 1888. The the building‘s front facade has a distinctive Queen Anne-style three-story projecting central bay made of copper. It was constructed during a period when many French-Canadians were immigrating to Holyoke and seeking housing. Main Street was being extensively developed at the time. The Clovis Robert Block, designed by G.P.B. Alderman, was constructed originally in 1881 and expanded in 1888. It was built by Clovis Robert, a French-Canadian, who came to Holyoke in 1872. He worked as a blacksmith and became wealthy in the real estate business, encouraging other French-Canadians to save their money and do the same.

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Posted in Commercial, Holyoke, Italianate, Queen Anne | Comments Off

John L. Mather House (1882)

The John L. Mather House, at 275 Elm Street in Northampton, is a Queen Anne style residence with some distinctively English elements (note the central gable). The house was built in 1882 for John L. Mather, a mason and contractor who served as mayor of Northampton in 1897 and again in 1899-1900.

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