Tag Archives: Stick Style

The Rev. Samuel G. Buckingham House (1875)

At 141 Mill Street in Springfield is a Stick-style house built in 1875. It was the home of Rev. Samuel G. Buckingham, who in 1847 had begun his forty-year tenure as pastor at South Congregational Church. Rev. Buckingham was the brother of William A. Buckingham, Governor of Connecticut during the Civil War, about whom he wrote a biography.

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The Julius H. Appleton House (1886)

Julius Henry Appleton (1840-1904) of Springfield was president and treasurer of the Riverside Paper Company. According to the Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of the State of Massachusetts, Vol II (1910):

under his management the business grew from a capacity of two tons a day to twenty-three tons a day when he retired, after continuous service of twenty-seven years, on the formation of the American Writing Paper Company in 1899. […] Mr. Appleton was a prominent member of the South Church. In politics he was a Republican. He was a member of the city council in 1869 and 1874, and in the council of Governor Crane in 1901 and 1902. He served on the state board of health seven years. He was a director of the Springfield City Library, and on his retirement from active business, gave generously to the Holyoke City Library and the City Hospital and House of Providence of that city. As a trustee of the Horace Smith estate he was interested in the distribution of aid to institutions and individuals so quietly that its extent was little appreciated by the general public.

Julius H. Appleton’s Queen Anne/Stick Style house, at 313 Maple Street in Springfield, was built around 1886.

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Saugus Town Hall (1875)

Is this a haunted mansion posted for Halloween? No, it’s the Town Hall of Saugus, built in 1875. An earlier town hall, built in 1837, is now an American Legion hall. Construction of the 1875 building put the town $50,000 in debt and was one of the reasons the neighborhood of East Saugus almost seceded to become a part of Lynn (the residents were unable to get a bill in both houses of the state legislature and the issue was dropped after the town appropriated $5,000 for laying water pipes in East Saugus). The Town Hall, which originally had the high school and library in the rear wing, was designed in the High Victorian Gothic and Stick styles by Lord & Fuller and underwent a $3 million restoration in 1998, when the building was returned to its original multi-colored, earth-toned exterior paint scheme. The Town Hall’s conference room was recently dedicated to the town’s history. There is also an organization called The Friends of Saugus town Hall.

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The Misses Sarah and Emma Cary House (1881)

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The home of Sarah and Emma Carey, the unmarried sisters of Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz, a famous educator and the co-founder and first president of Radcliffe College, was built in 1881-1882 on Brattle Street in Cambridge. The house is an excellent example of the Stick style of architecture.

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Posted in Cambridge, Houses, Stick Style | Tagged | 2 Comments