Tag Archives: Beacon Hill

John T. Hilton House (1826)

The house at 73 Joy Street in Beacon Hill in Boston was built in 1825-1826 for black hairdresser and musician John B. Holmes. The house is named for John Telemachus Hilton (1801-1864) (pdf), also a hairdresser, who was a Grand … Continue reading

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3 Smith Court, Boston (1799)

Smith Court, on Boston’s Beacon Hill, was the center of the city’s African American community in the nineteenth century. The house at 3 Smith Court, a double house with a common entryway, was built in 1799 by two white bricklayers. … Continue reading

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74 Joy Street, Boston (1862)

At 74 Joy Street in Boston’s Beacon Hill is a mansard-roofed building, built in 1861-1862. Designed by Gridley J.F. Bryant, it was built as Boston’s Police Station Number 3. In 1962, it ceased being used as a police station and … Continue reading

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John Coburn House (1844)

John P. Coburn (1811-1873), a free black resident of Beacon Hill in Boston, ran a clothing business and was a community activist. He was treasurer of the New England Freedom Association, which assisted fugitive slaves and, in 1852, he was … Continue reading

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The Lewis Hayden House (1833)

Lewis Hayden escaped from slavery in Kentucky in 1844 on the Underground Railroad and later settled in Boston, where he owned a used clothing store and became a leading abolitionist. He moved into his house, built in 1833 at 66 … Continue reading

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Abiel Smith School (1835)

In 1798, members of Boston’s black comunity organized a grammar school that met in in the home of Primus Hall, the son of Prince Hall, a community leader whose petitions to allow black children into the city’s school system had … Continue reading

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Vilna Shul (1919)

The Vilna Shul is an Orthodox synagogue on Phillips Street on Boston‘s Beacon Hill. It was built for a congregation of Eastern European immigrants, primarily from Vilnius, Lithuania. The Anshei Vilner Congregation was founded in 1893 in the West End … Continue reading

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