Monthly Archives: May 2011

Union Club, Boston (1809)

In 1863, some former members of the Somerset Club in Boston who were strong supporters of the Union formed the Union Club. They acquired a house at 8 Park Street in Boston to be their clubhouse. It had been built … Continue reading

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William Stevens House (1836)

Located at 14 Broad Street in Salem, next to the Jonathan Neal House, is a house built in 1836 for grocer William Stevens. It may have been built by William’s brother, James Stevens, a carpenter, who had acquired the land … Continue reading

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Glen Magna (1790)

Glen Magna Farms in Danvers began with a house, built in the 1790s by Jonathan Ingersoll. In 1812, the property was acquired by Capt. Joseph Peabody, wealthy Salem shipping merchant, as his gentleman’s estate. Additional acres were later acquired by … Continue reading

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David Boyce House (1782)

The David Boyce House, at 7 Lynn Street in Salem, was built in 1782. As mentioned in “Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution,” in The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. XI (1907), David Boyce, cordwainer and shoemaker, lived in Salem as early … Continue reading

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Wheeler House, South Natick (1831)

Moses Eames built the Greek Revival house at 4 Pleasant Street in South Natick in the 1830s, on land he had acquired in 1831. Eames later built a larger home next door on Pleasant Street in 1839. In 1845, he … Continue reading

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Cooley-Eveleth House (1827)

After his first home in Longmeadow burned, Calvin Cooley built a new brick house on the same site, 418 Longmeadow Street, in 1827. Calvin Cooley’s eldest son, James, became a lawyer and in 1826 was sent by Henry Clay, president … Continue reading

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Beckford-Whipple House (1739)

Built perhaps as early as 1739, the Beckford-Whipple House, at 2 Andover Street in Salem, was later significantly altered. In 1739, John and Rebecca Beckford deeded the house to their son, John Jr., who next left the house to his … Continue reading

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