Category Archives: Colonial Revival

Clarke/Benjamin Block (1884)

Clarke/Benjamin Block

The Clarke Block in Stockbridge was built in 1884 by druggist William B. Clarke. It replaced an earlier drug store that had stood in front of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. When the old store burned down, the area where it stood was converted into a front yard for the church. Clarke built his new store on a lot east of the church. In addition to the store, the building housed the town’s post office. The building was later called the Benjamin Block for Eugene Benjamin, who ran the store and lived next door. In 1923, he moved the building to its present location, at 31 Main Street. It was soon after stuccoed and remodeled in the Colonial Revival style. Its original roof and many of its stylistic features, such as a Stick Style gable screen, modillions, and a hooded stained glass window, were replaced. Retained from the earlier facade are the angled second floor front bay windows and a stained glass segmental-arched window on the west side.

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Alfred White House (1902)

60 Fairfield St., Springfield

The Queen Anne/Colonial Revival house at 60 Fairfield Street in Springfield was built in 1904 for Alfred White.

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Captain William Saunders House (1805)

39 Chestnut Street, Salem

The house at 39 Chestnut Street in Salem was built in 1805 for Captain Thomas Saunders. It was the first of the great brick Federal-style houses to be constructed on a street famed for its architecture. In 1893 the house was remodeled in the Colonial Revival style by architect Arthur Little for owner William G. Barker. The central bay window on the second floor above the original entryway was added at that time.

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W. F. Clark House (1902)

14 Fairfield St., Springfield

The W. F. Clark House, at 14 Fairfield Street in Springfield, is an eclectic late Queen Anne house (built 1901-1902) that has Dutch Colonial-style gables and Colonial Revival Palladian windows. The house bears a strong resemblance to the Henry Dwight Bradburn House in Hartford, Connecticut.

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Corcoran School (1900)

Corcoran School

The Corcoran School, at 40 Walnut Street in Clinton, opened in 1900 as a public grammar school. It is the third school to occupy the southwest corner of Walnut and Church Streets since 1846: the original wooden schoolhouse on the site was replaced by a high school, built in 1854, which became a grammar school in the 1880s and stood until it was taken down in 1899 in preparation for building the current structure. Designed by Boston architect Charles J. Bateman, the school was originally called the New Grammar School or School House #10, until 1918 when it was officially named in honor of John W. Corcoran, a former member of the school committee. Closed as a school in 1981, the building was rehabilitated in the 1990s to become the Corcoran House, an assisted living facility. The building has two notable facades, as seen in the images above and below.

Corcoran School

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Sedgwick Little House (1898)

Sedgwick Little House

At 18 Main Street in Stockbridge is a house known as the “Sedgwick Little House” or the Erik Erikson House. Its earliest section was originally a large cottage built c. 1855 (other dates claimed for the house are 1850 and the 1870s). In 1896, the property was acquired by Henry Dwight Sedgwick III, prominent Stockbridge resident and one of the well-known Sedgwick family. The Sedgwick Pie in Stockbridge Cemetery is the famous burial place of the Sedgwick family. In 1898, Henry D. Sedgwick built “the Sedgwick Little House” (the central section of the current Colonial Revival mansion) for his son Alexander (1867-1929). This seems to have replaced the original cottage (?). The house was later expanded through additions made between 1898 and 1908. The east and west wings were added by Edward L. Morse, who bought the house in 1908. Later, the house was purchased by the well-known writer and psychoanalyst Erik Erikson, who was working at the Austin Riggs Center at the time. The house is now a bed & breakfast called the Taggart House.

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74 Fairfield Street, Springfield (1903)

74 Fairfield St., Springfield

The house at 74 Fairfield Street in Springfield was built in 1903 for Henry Russell, but it is most notable as the childhood home of Dr. Seuss. Theodore Geisel was born on March 2, 1904, in his family’s home on Howard Street. In 1906, when he was two, his family moved to 74 Fairfield Street, where they would live until 1943. The author’s father, Theodore Geisel, senior, ran the family brewery until it closed due to prohibition. He then became superintendent of city parks, which included the local zoo. Ted Geisel moved away after he graduated from Dartmouth in 1925, but images from his childhood in Springfield would later reappear in his illustrated children’s books.

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