Harvard Unitarian Universalist Church (1967)

Harvard Unitarian Universalist Church

The first Congregational meeting house in Harvard was erected in 1733. This was replaced by a newer and larger structure completed in 1774. A steeple was added in 1786 and a bell was acquired in 1806. The congregation split in 1821, with the more conservative Trinitarians leaving to form the Evangelical Congregational Church. The large old meeting house, which had fallen into disrepair, was replaced with a smaller building in 1840. This was destroyed by fire in 1875 and a fourth meeting house, designed in the Queen Anne style, was soon built. This church was also destroyed by a fire, on December 13th, 1964, after a Sunday service. The current Harvard Unitarian Universalist Church, at 9 Ayer Road, was dedicated on June 18th, 1967.

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Red Lion Inn (1897)

Red Lion Inn

The famous Red Lion Inn at 30 Main Street in Stockbridge has a long history going back to 1773. The structure grew from its early beginnings through additions. Its current configuration dates to 1897 after it was rebuilt following a fire in 1896.

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Frank L. Dean House (1901)

10 Cedar St., Worcester

The house at 10 Cedar Street in Worcester was built c. 1901 and was the home of Frank L. Dean (1865-1934). From 1879 to 1898 he had lived in the family home at 14 Cedar Street. In 1889 he married Mabel Houghton Dean and they had shared that house with his mother and sisters. Dean was a lawyer, clerk of the Superior Court and Republican politician who served as a city councilman from 1901 to 1902. Since 1966 the house has been home to Preservation Worcester.

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Naumkeag Trust Company (1900)

Naumkeag Trust Company

The building at 217 Essex Street in Salem was built in 1900 to house the retail store of W.E. Hoyt Company. A decade later, the Hoyt Block was acquired by the Naumkeag Trust Company, which hired Boston architects Franklin H. Hutchins and Arthur W. Rice to remodel the interior to become a bank building. The history of the Naumkeag Trust Company is related in Vol. II of the Municipal History of Essex County in Massachusetts (1922):

The Naumkeag Bank was incorporated March 17, 1831, with $200,000 capital, subsequently increased to $500,000. It commenced business in the Benjamin Dodge store building, on Essex street, opposite the Essex House, then was moved to the Manning building, and in 1872 to the second floor of the Asiatic building, Washington street. David Pingree was its first president. In 1864 this institution was changed to the Naumkeag National Bank.

It then became the Naumkeag Trust Company, which was established October 7, 1909. The building is now home to The Gathering at Salem, an interdenominational Christian church.

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Gale and Dickinson Store (1896)

Gale and Dickinson Store

Currently home to the Harvard General Store in the Town of Harvard, the building at 1 Still River Road was built in 1896 on a site occupied by at least two other earlier stores. The Nathaniel Stacy Bookbinding Store occupied the site in a building built by 1831 that burned in 1850. This was replaced by a commercial building (Union Hall) that was moved to the current site of the Harvard Post Office to make way for the present store building, originally occupied by the Gale and Dickinson Store. Read More

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Helen Hills Hills Chapel, Smith College (1955)

Helen Hills Hills Chapel

Smith College did not originally have a chapel because its founders wanted students to be part of the Northampton community and attend local churches. Finally in 1953, an alumna from the class of 1908 named Helen Hills Hills (her maiden name was hills and she married a husband named Hills) offered funds for a college chapel. She stipulated that the building should strictly follow the design of traditional New England meeting houses of the eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Designed by William and Geoffrey Platt (sons of Charles Adams Platt) of New York, the nondenominational Helen Hills Hills Chapel was completed in 1955. The interior of the Chapel (123 Elm Street, Northampton) has recently been modified to create a more flexible space: the old fixed pews have been removed in favor of 300 custom-made oak chairs that can be laid out in different configurations.

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Lancaster Mills Company, Building No. 23 (1870)

Building No. 23, Lancaster Mills Company

One of the buildings of the former Lancaster Mills factory complex in Clinton is a one-story brick octagonal structure that was built before 1870 (c. 1857-1870). Designated Building No. 23, it served as offices. Originally located at the west corner of Mill No. 1, it was moved between 1879 and 1898 to the southwest corner of the complex and connected to a small one-story ell. In 1918, the rear addition was expanded into a larger structure, designed by Lockwood, Green & Co.

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