Old Holyoke Railroad Station (1883)

station

The City of Holyoke has a railroad station designed by the famed architect H. H. Richardson. Located at 12 Bowers Street, it was built in 1883-1885 as the Boston and Maine Railroad Station, also known as the Connecticut River Railroad Station. No longer a station, its later history included use as the Star Automotive Warehouse. It is currently an endangered building.
Check out the following PDF documents:
On the history of the station: http://www.holyokeredevelopment.com/wp-content/uploads/Depot-Sq.-Presentation-Boards-FINAL-small-file.pdf
On the potential reuse of the station: http://www.holyokeredevelopment.com/wp-content/uploads/Part-1-from-RICHARDSON_Report_FINAL.pdf
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Springfield Street Railway Trolley Barn (1897)

Trolley Barn

At 2273 Main Street and Carew Street in Springfield is a Romanesque-style structure known as the Trolley Barn. Designed by the local architectural firm of Gardner, Pyne & Gardner, it was built in 1897 and served as offices, terminal, garage, and maintenance facility for the Springfield Street Railway Company (formed in 1870). It was once one of several trolley barns along Main Street that serviced the city’s streetcars. Trolleys were eventually overtaken by buses and in 1958 the building was acquired by Peter Pan Bus Lines, which used it as both a bus garage and as a corporate office. Peter Pan later moved to a larger facility. The Trolley Barn was renovated in the early 1980s and then turned over to Coach Builders, Inc., a Peter Pan affiliate that that specialized in rebuilding and refurbishing old buses. A minivan crashed into the corner of the building on January 15, 2015.

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Union Station, Northampton (1896)

Union Station in Northampton was built in 1896-1897. A train station that consolidated the services of Northampton’s three railroads, it has also been home to the Union Station restaurant, which closed last year, and the Tunnel Bar, located in a tunnel that was once an entrance to the station.

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Amherst Depot (1853)

Although today hidden down a side street, Amherst’s small brick train station was once surrounded by a hub of activity, including factories, a hotel and a bank. Built in 1853 by Robert Cutler, the Amherst Depot originally served the Amherst & Belchertown Railroad and later the New London Northern Railroad and the Central Vermont Railroad. Restored in 1976, it continues as a passenger station today.

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