Category Archives: Architectural Style

Jonas Merriam House & Tavern (1807)

Jonas Merriam House & Tavern (1807)

A tavern had long stood at the site where Jonas Merriam built a Federal-style house in 1807 at 1 Elm Street, near the Common, in Harvard. Merriam built the house to also serve as a tavern that would take advantage of traffic expected to pass by on the newly opened Union Turnpike. As described in Vol. 2 of the History of Harvard (1894), by Henry S. Nourse:

When the Union Turnpike was completed and Harvard expected to become a way station on a great thoroughfare between Boston and the upper valley of the Connecticut, Jonas Merriam’s tavern was opened in rivalry with Ezra Wetherbee’s, which faced it across the common. Neither turnpike nor inn rewarded the owners’ hopes, and Merriam removed to Shirley in 1816, selling his estate to Seth Nason.

Seth Nason was a founder of the Evangelical Church and town treasurer from 1825-34. He operated a shop in the house before purchasing the building at the corner of Still River Road and Massachusetts Avenue in 1820. Among later owners of the house was Dr. Augustus Robbins. The Evangelical Church also used it for a time as a parsonage in the mid-nineteenth century. The house has had various owners since then.

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D. H. DeLand House (1904)

D. H. DeLand House

The D. H. DeLand House is at 168 Pineywoods Avenue in the Forest Park section of Springfield. The house was built in 1904.

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Posted in Houses, Queen Anne, Shingle Style, Springfield | Comments Off

Charles and Lucretia M. Daniels House (1873)

Charles and Lucretia M. Daniels House

The Gothic Revival cottage at 29 Arlington Street in Northampton was built on land acquired by Lucretia Daniels, wife of Charles Daniels, in 1873. By 1880 the couple were living in the house with their two teen-aged sons and by 1884 Lucretia was listed as a widow. She lived in the house through 1917.

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Calvin and Jacob Haskell House (1800)

Calvin and Jacob Haskell House

The house at 216 Still River Road in Harvard is believed to have been built by the brothers Calvin and Jacob Haskell around 1800. Calvin was licensed to sell alcohol to travelers along the well-traveled thoroughfare of Still River Road. In the 1820s he gave up this business and became active in the local temperance society. Jacob Haskell served as terms as selectman and Justice of the Peace in 1822. The house passed to his son Levi in 1843 and was bought by William Bowles Willard in 1864. He was clerk of the Baptist Society, to which he donated a Stevens organ in 1870. In 1868 he exchanged his house for the nearby Baptist parsonage. The house at 216 Still River Road then became the new parsonage until it was sold in 1939.

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Catholic Society Parsonage, Northampton (1866)

41 King St., Northampton

The house at 71 King Street in Northampton was built in 1866 to serve as a parsonage for St. Mary’s Catholic church. It was designed by William Fenno Pratt, who also designed a similar parsonage for the Congregational church. Built in 1845, St. Mary’s was Northampton’s first Catholic church. This almost entirely Irish parish constructed a new church on Elm Street in 1885 and a new French-Canadian parish took over the old church. This was later replaced by a new church, the present Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church at 101 King Street. Since the move of St. Mary’s Parish, the old parsonage has been used for other purposes, including as a funeral parlor.

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Posted in Houses, Northampton, Victorian Eclectic | Tagged | Comments Off

Armory, Northampton (1900)

Armory, Northampton

At 131 King Street in Northampton is an armory building constructed by the city in 1899-1900 and purchased by the state in 1912. Designed by Gardner, Pyne & Gardner of Springfield, it served as constabulary headquarters and as barracks for police and military groups. It also provided a large interior space for recreational and civic events. It now houses offices.

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Posted in Gothic, Military, Northampton | Comments Off

Miss Florence Diner (1941)

Miss Florence Diner

Miss Florence Diner, located at 99 Main Street in the Florence section of Northampton, is a modified 1941 barrel-roofed diner manufactured by the Worcester Lunch Car Company. The modifications were made in the late 1940s when, to increase its size, the diner was remodeled with additions that gave it an L-shape and a cross-barrel roof. The home of the diner‘s original owner, Maurice Alexander, was later attached to the diner and opened as a restaurant.

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