Bismark Hotel (1900)

In the early 1860s, businessman John C. Buschmann established the Railroad House Hotel on Depot Square, near the train station, in Westfield. In 1899 his son, Thomas Buschmann, hired architect Augustus W. Holton to design a larger hotel to replace the existing one. Called the Bismarck Hotel, it opened in 1900. The building (16 Union Avenue) continued as a hotel until 1930, after which it housed a series of small industrial firms. In 2001 it was acquired by Pilgrim Candle, which already occupied Buschmann’s Block next door. Read More

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Westfield Railroad Depot (1879)

The railroad depot in Westfield (16 North Elm Street) was built in 1879. Today the former railroad station houses an insurance business.

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Old Town Hall, Westfield (1837)

The building at 20 Broad Street in Westfield, erected in 1837-1838, served as Town Hall from 1839 until 1920, when a city government was organized. It then continued as City Hall until 1958. The building also held the first formally organized Westfield High School classes from 1855 until 1867. The old Town/City Hall once had a cupola, which was removed in 1912. The neighboring First Congregational Church purchased the building in 1962. It now houses The Carson Center for Human Services.

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Victory Theater (1919)

The Victory Theater (spelled “Theatre” in stone on the building itself) is a grand movie/stage show palace erected in 1919 by Goldstein Brothers Amusement Company at 81–89 Suffolk Street in Holyoke. It was named in honor of the Allied victory in World War One. The theater suffered fire damaged in 1942, but continued in operation until it closed in 1979. The building remained vacant for decades, its blade sign being removed in 1986 and marquee torn down in 1991. In recent years a restoration of the old theater has been undertaken by the Massachusetts International Festival of the Arts with plans to open in 2017.

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Conway Block (1885)

The Conway Block, located at 301 High Street in Holyoke, is a commercial building erected c. 1885. It takes its name from early tenant Martin P. Conway, a dealer in pianos and organs.

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Herbert J. Frink House (1885)

Herbert J. Frink was an agent and later president and treasurer of the Holyoke Machine Company, president of the Peoples Savings Bank and a director of the Hadley Falls National Bank. He had patents for a calendar-roll, an adjustable bearing box and a wood-pulp grinder. Frink lived in the house at 228 Pine Street in Holyoke. It remained in his family into the early 1960s.

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Taber Block (1884)

The commercial building at 281-283 (285) High Street in Holyoke, designed by George P. B. Alderman, was built c. 1884. By 1891 the building was owned by Frank L. Taber, a watchmaker and jeweler. Other businesses have occupied the building over the years, including, starting in 1965, the camera shop of Raymond D’Addario, a photographer who once headed the photography department at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials.

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